Earth History Standards Crosswalk Document


Earth History Content Cross-walking Document





Lesson
Objective
Standards Addressed (include prioritization E, I or C)
Lesson Prioritization (E, I, C)
Timing Suggestion(s)
Investigation 1: Pushing the Envelope
Make observations and generate evidence to support an idea.

Make inferences based on evidence.

1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
E


I
45-50 min
Investigation 2: Into the Grand Canyon
Use photographic and video images of rocks and landforms to gather data about the Grand Canyon.

Observe, describe, and compare rocks using appropriate tools.

1.1.1. Understand that: Scientific investigations involve asking testable questions. Different kinds of questions suggest different scientific investigations. The current body of scientific knowledge guides the investigation.
1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.

1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.

E


E


I
Two 45-50 min. classes
Investigation 3: Grand Canyon Rocks
Observe and compare photographs and rock samples representing two locations along the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon.

Use acid to test for the presence of calcium carbonate in a rock sample.

Identify and name three sedimentary rocks: limestone, sandstone, and shale.

Correlate the rocks from two locations along the Colorado River.

Investigate how differential erosion has changed the landscape of the Colorado Plateau.

1.1.2. Understand that: A valid investigation controls variables. Different experimental designs and strategies can be developed to answer the same question.
1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.

1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.1.3 The formation of sediment and soil requires a long period of time as rocks are weathered, eroded and deposited.

5.2.4. Constructive processes that build up the land and the destructive processes of weathering and erosion shape and reshape the land surface. The height of Earth landforms is a result of the difference between the rate of uplift and the rate of erosion at a particular location.
E


E


I


I


I
Four -Five
45-50 min. classes
Investigation 4: My Sediments Exactly
Relate the processes of weathering, erosion, and deposition to the formation of sedimentary rock and landforms.
1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.1.3 The formation of sediment and soil requires a long period of time as rocks are weathered, eroded and deposited.
5.2.3. Surface water always flows downhill. Areas of higher elevation separate watersheds. In Delaware, this water eventually reaches the Delaware River, the Delaware Bay, the Atlantic Ocean or the Chesapeake Bay.

5.2.4. Constructive processes that build up the land and the destructive processes of weathering and erosion shape and reshape the land surface. The height of Earth landforms is a result of the difference between the rate of uplift and the rate of erosion at a particular location.
7.2.1. The Earth’s present day species evolved from earlier, distinctly different species. Many thousands of layers of sedimentary rock provide evidence for the long history of the Earth and for the long history of changing life forms whose remains are found in the rocks. More recently deposited rock layers are more likely to contain fossils resembling existing spec

E


I


I


I


I


C
Ten 45-50 min. classes
Investigation 5: Limestone
Identify sediments in limestone

Investigate how carbon dioxide contributes to the precipitation of calcium carbonate in water.

Model the formation of limestone layers in an ancient enviroment.

1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.1.3 The formation of sediment and soil requires a long period of time as rocks are weathered, eroded and deposited.
5.2.4. Constructive processes that build up the land and the destructive processes of weathering and erosion shape and reshape the land surface. The height of Earth landforms is a result of the difference between the rate of uplift and the rate of erosion at a particular location.

E


I


I

I
Four 45-50 min. classes
Investigation 6: It's About Time
Create a personal time line of some period in their lives.

Construct a time line of geological events and prehistoric life.

Apply the concept of a time line to Earth history.

Determine the relative age of rocks, based on association with other rock

1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.2.11. Past geological events and environments can be reconstructed by interpreting fossilized remains and successive layering of sedimentary rocks.
7.2.1. The Earth’s present day species evolved from earlier, distinctly different species. Many thousands of layers of sedimentary rock provide evidence for the long history of the Earth and for the long history of changing life forms whose remains are found in the rocks. More recently deposited rock layers are more likely to contain fossils resembling existing species.
7.2.4. Extinction of a species occurs when the environment changes and the adaptive characteristics of a species are insufficient to allow its survival. Most of the species that have lived on Earth no longer exist.

E


I


I


C


I
Five 45-50 min. classes
Investigation 6a: Plate Tectonics
Cite three pieces of evidence that indicate the continents were once a large land mass.
1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.2.11. Past geological events and environments can be reconstructed by interpreting fossilized remains and successive layering of sedimentary rocks.
5.2.12. The fit of continental coastlines, the similarity of rock types and fossilized remains provide evidence that today’s continents were once a single land mass. The continents moved to their current positions on plates driven by energy from Earth’s interior.

E


I


I


I
Four 45-50 min. classes
Investigation 7: Fossils and Time
Use index fossils to correlate rock layers in three locations on the Colorado Plateau.

Compare various events and fossils to derive a succession of animals over geologic time.

Make inferences from fossil evidence that contribute to an understanding of fossil succession.

1.1.4. Understand that: There is much experimental and observational evidence that supports a large body of knowledge. The scientific community supports known information until new experimental evidence arises that does not match existing explanations. This leads to the evolution of the scientific body of knowledge.
1.1.6. Understand that: Scientific habits of mind and other sources of knowledge and skills are essential to scientific inquiry. Habits of mind include tolerance of ambiguity, skepticism, openness to new ideas, and objectivity. Other knowledge and skills include mathematics, reading, writing, and technology.
5.2.11. Past geological events and environments can be reconstructed by interpreting fossilized remains and successive layering of sedimentary rocks.
5.2.12. The fit of continental coastlines, the similarity of rock types and fossilized remains provide evidence that today’s continents were once a single land mass. The continents moved to their current positions on plates driven by energy from Earth’s interior.
7.2.1. The Earth’s present day species evolved from earlier, distinctly different species. Many thousands of layers of sedimentary rock provide evidence for the long history of the Earth and for the long history of changing life forms whose remains are found in the rocks. More recently deposited rock layers are more likely to contain fossils resembling existing species.

E


I


I


I


C
Five 45-50 min. classes